Common Mistakes When Public Speaking – 11 to 15

11. Failing to Start Strong Staring strong is very important and you should grab your audience’s attention within the first 30 to 60 seconds, so they know exactly why they are there and why they are listening to you. Simply put, the first thing that you say is one of the most likely things to be remembered by the audience. …

Preparation

Previously I spoke about “owning your content and the importance of preparation and I mentioned how Sir Winston Churchill spent 1 hour preparing for every minute he spoke. There are no shortcuts in preparing an effective and powerful speech and as they say “prior preparation prevents pitifully poor performance” Mary Atkins in her book “Finding your voice: ten steps to …

Overcoming Fear Of Public Speaking – Podcast No 1

As you work towards overcoming fear of public speaking and becoming more confident, it is important to recognise the role of anxiety in public speaking. This podcast explains how anxiety, fear and nerves are in fact a normal part of public speaking and what you can do to better understand these feelings as you speak. Podcast

Own Your Content

As a presenter or speaker, you need to own your content Sir Winston Churchill used to practise for 1 hour for every minute that he spoke, to ensure he knew his subject well, he knew all the facts and that he owned his content. Preparation is a key ingredient in effective and confident public speaking and it allows you to …

Expand Your Comfort Zone

Expanding your comfort zone and gradually increasing the complexity of the speaking tasks that you undertake is one way to become more confident and in control of any negative feelings associated with public speaking. Psychologists would probably describe this as desensitisation. Start with speaking tasks that you find easy and only have a small amount of fear or anxiety associated …

Who Are You Speaking For

It’s not about you As a speaker, presenter, educator and trainer it is always important to remember that you are speaking for the audience. You are speaking to inform them, persuade them, to help them achieve something in their life or to overcome a problem. You are not speaking for yourself, because you like the sound of your voice or …